NFDA Home > International Regulations > Canada - Shipping Requirements
Join our Linked In Group! Follow NFDA on Twitter! Find us on Facebook! Connect with NFDA on Google+ View NFDA's YouTube Channel! View NFDA's Flickr Photostream!

Canada - Shipping Requirements

Requirements:

Transport of Human Remains

1. Upon importation, cadavers, body parts and other human remains must be accompanied by a death certificate. If the death certificate is written in a language other than English or French, it would be helpful for the importer or exporter to provide a translation into either official language.

2. Persons wishing to import a cadaver, body part or other human remains where no death certificate is available can assist the quarantine officer by providing other evidence, such as a letter from a coroner, identifying the cadaver, body part or other human remains and attesting that they are free of vectors. If written in a language other than English or French, it would be helpful for the importer or exporter to provide a translation into either official language

The following are conditions set by the Canada Border Service Agency as to standards set for border agents for receiving human remains and should be used as a guide on shipping standards as well

1. Death certificates should be considered valid unless a screening officer suspects that there has been fraud involved. In such cases, a quarantine officer is to be notified. A list of quarantine stations is available in Appendix B.

2. Depending on the presence or absence of a death certificate and the cause(s) of death, screening officers are to follow these protocols:

(a) If the death certificate clearly indicates that the deceased did not have a communicable disease the remains can be released;

(b) If the death certificate does not set out the immediate cause of death or any antecedent causes, if the container is:

(i) hermetically sealed, the remains can be released with an advisory that the container should not be opened; or,

(ii) not hermetically sealed, the screening officer must contact the quarantine officer;

(c) If there is no death certificate accompanying the cadaver, body part or other human remains and if the container is:

(i) hermetically sealed, the remains can be released with an advisory that the container should not be opened; or,

(ii) not hermetically sealed, the screening officer must contact the quarantine officer; or

(d) If the death certificate indicates that the deceased had a communicable disease and if the container is:

(i) hermetically sealed, the remains can be released with an advisory that the container should not be opened; or,

(ii) not hermetically sealed, the screening officer must contact the quarantine officer.

3. A screening officer must also inform a quarantine officer if there are reasonable grounds to suspect that the cadaver, body part or human remains have a communicable disease or arrive in a damaged state (e.g., the hermetic seal appears broken, the container is leaking, the container has been damaged, or appears to have been compromised). This applies whether or not a death certificate has been provided

4. Communicable diseases of concern do not include HIV/AIDS or hepatitis. A list of these diseases can be found in Appendix A and the schedule at the end of the Quarantine Act. Therefore, unless there is another reason why the cadaver, body part or human remains.

Transport of Cremated Remains

1. Cremated human remains, because they do not pose a quarantine risk, do not require a death certificate. However, it is recommended that when transporting the cremated remains that the importer should carry a copy of the death and cremation certificate and ensure that the remains are in a container that can easily be scanned (e.g., cardboard, wood or plastic).

 

Consulates: http://www.state.gov/s/cpr/rls/fco/209846.htm#canada

Website: http://www.canadianembassy.org/